Thursday, June 13

Climate Change

Summer 2023 Temperatures Were The Worst In 2000 Years
Climate Change

Summer 2023 Temperatures Were The Worst In 2000 Years

If people don't think the Earth is heating, they should feel the temperature. According to scientists, summer 2023 was the warmest year in over 2000 years.The data shows that land temperatures were about 3.76 degrees Fahrenheit higher, between the averages between 1850 and 1900. To find this information, researchers combined measurements from thousands of meteorological stations. They then analyzed the June through August surface temperature across the Northern Hemisphere.They also spent months taking samples to compare tree ring reconstruction with nine of the longest temperature-sensitive tree chronologies. Scientists said that these rings are the only way to provide annual temperature reconstructions.To make changes to our atmosphere, we must start acting now. We need to s...
NASA Confirms 2023 Climate Was Warmest Year on Record
Climate Change

NASA Confirms 2023 Climate Was Warmest Year on Record

According to an Analysis by NASA, earth's surface temperature in the 2023 Climate was the warmest year on record. Global temperatures last year were around 2.1 degrees above average.NASA is comparing this data to a period between 1951-1980, which was recorded by scientists from NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies.“NASA and NOAA’s global temperature report confirms what billions of people around the world experienced last year; we are facing a climate crisis. From extreme heat, to wildfires, to rising sea levels, we can see our Earth is changing. There’s still more work to be done, but President Biden and communities across America are taking more action than ever to reduce climate risks and help communities." NASA Administrator Bill Nelson.In 2023, millions of people a...
NASA’s PACE Satellite Will Help Research The Climate
Climate Change, NASA

NASA’s PACE Satellite Will Help Research The Climate

Next month, NASA will launch a three-year mission to study Earth's atmosphere and oceans from space using the PACE Satellite.PACE Stands for Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud and Ocean Satellite. It's scheduled to launch as soon as February 6, and will help gather data to help fight air pollution and climate change.“The ocean and atmosphere interact in ways that need ongoing research to fully understand. With PACE, we’ll open our eyes to many new aspects of climate change.” Jeremy Werdell, project scientist for the PACE missionAccording to NASA, Climate Change's impact on the ocean is leading to sea levels rising, as well as marine heat haves to a loss of biodiversity.One thing PACE will help NASA do is view Phytoplankton. These are microscopic organisms that float near the water'...